Monaco – Inside F1’s Greatest Race

By: snowgood

Jul 18 2021

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Category: books, Cars, Sport

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My appetite for reading is now being assisted by the varied selection on offer at East Grinstead Library.

I’m ever mindful of the fact that I tend to read what I like, and really ought to broaden my literary horizons.

It’s so easy to pick up yet another “Thriller” or “Walking” book, but on my latest trip I’ve added a bit of variety.

In the run up to the British Grand Prix I thought this might whet my appetite.

It’s a pretty well written account of the most glamourous race in the Grand Prix calendar. I’ve never heard of Folley, but he was a hack for the tabloids, and had access to numerous folk in the sporting scene.

So how did it go?

The book glimpses behind the scenes, and into the minds of drivers and team principals alike. There’s fresh material I’d not encountered and a fair bit of frequently recounted stuff which has no real connection with the event whatsoever.

As the British Press never properly feted Olivier Panis the winner of the 1996 event it was worth reading the whole book to see how one of the sport’s greatest upsets actually occurred.

Whilst I attended races which included Keke Rosberg I had no real idea what he’s like, so that was another useful chapter.

All things considered the book does indeed fit the brief given by the title, but I was left somewhat disappointed.

No where can I find a book that covers Beltoise’s epic win in 1972? Just how did Moss and Hill come to dominate here in the late fifties and sixties?

I guess that’s what happens to us bookworms, we start on a course and invariably want more.

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